2015 Training Course - Agricultural Distortions & Value Chains

Event Date: 
1 Sep, 2015 - 3 Sep, 2015 
Location: 
IFPRI - Dakar 

 

Overview

The objective of the training is to develop the participants’ expertise in understanding and analyzing value chains, their creation and the factors that influence them. The training is set out so as to favor both the understanding of the conceptual issues and the more applied and quantitative approaches to analysis of value chains. The conceptual and the applied analysis will be applied to 4 perspectives:

  1. Agricultural distortions and value chains
  2. Trade policy and value chains
  3. Food and Nutrition Security and value chains
  4. Quantitative tools for value chains (data and empirical methodology). 

All course participants are expected to prepare for this course by reviewing the material in the AGRODEP GAMS Training Toolbox. The Toolbox is available in English and French.

OBJECTIVES

At the end of the 3 – day workshop, it is expected that the participants should:

  • Analyze measurement of distortions along the agricultural value chain. More specifically, analyze how agricultural distortions create and influence the agricultural value chain;
  • Understand how trade policy creates value chains;
  • Understand how creation and evolution of value chains might impact FNS (through various channels such as trends towards global value chains). 
  • Understand applied methods of data definition and collection in the value chains, in coordination with empirical methods in mapping value chains for analysis

CoURSE OUTLINE

 

Day 1

Day 2

Day 3

AM

Agricultural distortions and value chains: measurement of distortions along the agricultural value chain
1. Simla
2. Focus on analysis of measurement of distortions along the agricultural value chain. Specifically, analyze how agricultural distortions create and influence the agricultural value chain. Examples of Visual Basic code for data collection and comparison.  
3. Requires Excel and Visual Basic

Trade policy and value chains
1. Simla
2. Microeconomic foundations of Value Chain Analysis
a. Modeling value chains using partial equilibrium models and analyzing the link between trade policy and value chains
b. Theory and GAMS example using ‘Differential Export Taxes along the Oilseeds Value Chain: A Partial Equilibrium Analysis

(Requires Excel and GAMS)

 

Quantitative tools for value chains: empirical methods in mapping value chains for analysis
1. Derek/Emilio
a. Discussion on surveys and survey tool development with a focus on formulation of economic problems in terms of distortions and their measurement
b. Survey tool development and analytical constructs for microeconomics analysis of market opportunities for smallholder producers (case study in Uganda)
c. Example of studies on animal disease and the impacts of treatment programs

 

PM

FNS and value chains: Review of trends and shifts in the organization and governance of global value chains

1. Luca

2. trade in value added databases, indicators about trade decomposition, participation and position into global value chains

3. CGE perspective and database application (some applications using the GTAP database)

Quantitative tools for value chains: applied methods of data definition and collection in the value chain
1. Derek/Emilio
a. Measurement of value chain performance. Derived performance measures and survey instruments to measure them
b. Analysis of performance measures in the Ethiopian live cattle value chains: mapping and survey procedures.
c. Microeconomic applications survey data such as estimtation of WTP for product attributes, and price transmission along value chains.

 

FNS and value chains: 
1. Luca
2. Based on a Workshop ‘Global Value Chains for Food and Nutrition Security'

a. Case studies dealing with different countries/products: e.g., grains in SSA, bananas in Cameroon, wheat in Middle-East and North Africa, quinoa in Bolivia, maize in Uganda

 


Applications

In order to apply for this course, AGRODEP members must complete the following by July 13, 2015:


InstructorS

Derek Baker, University of New England, Armidale, Australia
Luca Salvatici, University Roma Tre, Rome, Italy
Simla Tokgoz, International Food Policy Research Institute, Washington DC, USA